Welcome to the THERAPY-IV Deep Sea Fishing Blog. Captain Stan Saffan and his crew of deep sea sportfishing experts have been fishing the South Florida waters for over 40 years, providing private and shared deep sea and Biscayne Bay charter boat experiences of a lifetime to thousands of people that have had a chance to fish with them. It doesn’t matter if it’s your first time fishing in Miami or you are a master big game monster catcher, you can count on the THERAPY-IV to make your day at sea a memorable one.

We would also love to hear from you! Whether your Deep Sea Fishing Experience was with us or on your own, tell us about it! This will be a place to discuss all things Sports Fishing! Everything from products to techniques, we want to hear it all! I look forward to hearing from all you avid Deep Sea Fishermen out there!

Go get 'em!



Tuesday, May 18, 2021

Hammerhead Sharks and Deep Sea Fishing


The Hammerhead Shark has an infamous reputation. They are of global apex predator size, weight, and have a gnarly set of teeth. Did you know they are nine different species of hammerhead sharks? The biggest one, the Great Hammerhead, can weigh up to 1000 pounds! Other species include the Carolina Hammerhead, the Scalloped Bonnethead, the Whitefin Hammerhead, the Scalloped Hammerhead, the Scoophead, the Winghead Shark, the Bonnethead, the Smalleye Hammerhead, and the Smooth Hammerhead. When Miami deep sea fishing you're likely to encounter the Great Hammerhead, and sometimes the Scalloped Hammerhead and Smooth Hammerhead.


You can find the sharks offshore between latitudes of 45 degrees north and 45 degrees south. These sharks are loners and have been known to travel alone over 750 miles during migration. They can swim quite deep, reaching depths as low as 980 feet, but mostly hang out in depths of around 260 feet. 


The official world record of a Hammerhead catch was in 2006 off the coast of Florida, weighing 1280 pounds and reaching lengths of 14 feet!


When Miami fishing you can be sure that you will be safe from an attack. Hammerhead sharks don't typically attack people since they prefer marine life. Most Hammerhead attacks have later been found to be a recorded mistake for other species such as the great white, tiger, bill, and white tip oceanic sharks. In fact, there have only been 17 actual recorded hammerhead attacks, and all have been nonfatal. 


There are legalities involved with fishing for hammerheads. It's illegal to fish for great, smooth, and scalloped hammerhead sharks in Florida. Scalloped Hammerheads are a protected species in the United States, the first and only Hammerhead to be marked as such. 

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